Philosophical Sayings About Worldly Matters 76-8
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  (This is a translation of H.H. Dorje Chang Buddha III Wan Ko Yeshe Norbu’s philosophical sayings about worldly matters originally written in Chinese.)

  LXXVI.

  To forgive is evidence of one’s virtue. Right or wrong, success or failure will eventually become apparent to the public, and those who trespassed against you will be ashamed of themselves.

  LXXVII.

  What one has learned may dull one’s sensitivity to new knowledge and throw one into the darkness of ignorance. If such ignorance is not broken, one cannot hope to become intelligent, still less reach the realm of wisdom.

  LXXVIII.

  When someone criticizes or slanders you, there must be some mistakes you have made in handling things inappropriately, or at least you have failed to win people’s approval and respect for what you did. What you must do in this case is to make full criticism of yourself.

  LXXIX.

  Extraordinary feats always arouse instant enthusiasm in those who want to be able to do the same. But their enthusiasm will diminish with the passage of time until it evaporates. This happens because they have not been able to make even a beginning. The lesson: Act now or never.

  LXXX.

  The world is impermanent, and nothing exists forever. Animate beings are destined to die, and those inanimate are bound for destruction, because the creation of all things is based on the composition of the necessary causes and conditions. Formless and nameless, everything is illusory, and it comes and goes following the pattern of cause and effect. That is why all’s well that ends well, and all’s evil that ends evil. 
The photographs by H.H. Dorje Chang Buddha III, formally know as Master Wan Ko Yee, include scenery, people, animals, etc. These beautiful, artistic pictures taken with a camera make use of lighting, natural colors, and the skillful arrangement of objects.  Above is one of them: Expression of Joy.